Archive for August 21, 2009

Important Discussions are Taking Place in Pittsburgh – Root Shock Adopted at the University of Pittsburgh

By Mindy Fullilove, who is a M.D. and professor of public health at Columbia University, Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America, and What We Can Do About It is an important discussion of urban renewal and its effect on the African American community, when between 1949 and 1973 this federal program, spearheaded by business andreal estate interests, destroyed 1,600 African American neighborhoods in cities across the country.

Root Shock has been taught in several courses including the University of Pittsburgh’s course on the History of Black Pittsburgh. (more…)

August 21, 2009 at 8:56 pm Leave a comment

Vanderbilt University’s Political Science Department Takes Up The Strongest Tribe

strongest

From a universally respected combat journalist, The Strongest Tribe: War, Politics, and the Endgame in Iraq is a gripping history based on five years of front-line reporting about how the war was turned around–and the choice now facing America.

The Strongest Tribe by Bing West will be the book taught by Vanderbilt University’s Political Science Department for their course: War in Iraq. (more…)

August 21, 2009 at 8:40 pm Leave a comment

Le Moyne College Teaching Against the Machine for Fall 2009

From the author hailed by the New York Times Book Review for his “drive-by brilliance” and dubbed by the New York Times Magazine as “one of the country’s most eloquent and acid-tongued critics” comes a ruthless challenge to the conventional wisdom about the most consequential cultural development of our time: the Internet.

Le Moyne College is teaching Against the Machine this Fall.

For more information on the book and the author, click here.

To read an excerpt, click here.

To order an examination copy, click here.

August 21, 2009 at 8:17 pm Leave a comment

Inventing Japan Adopted at University of Southern California

Inventing Japan TR

Notable author Ian Buruma, who has written widely on Japan, here offers an admirably succinct, tightly constructed history of Japan’s transformation from feudal state to host of the 1964 Olympics, with special focus on World War II.

Inventing Japan: 1853-1964 by Ian Buruma has been selected by the  University of Southern California’s East Asian Studies Center for a course on East Asian Societies.

“Buruma makes intriguing comparisons between Japan’s development and that of European states, particularly Germany… [The book] will help students make sense of the world within which [Japan’s political] traditions emerged. Highly recommended.”—Choice (American Library Association)

For more information on the book and the author, click here.

To read an excerpt, click here.

Order an exam copy here.

August 21, 2009 at 8:08 pm Leave a comment

Students at University of Missouri School of Journalism Get Taught The Elements of Journalism

elements

Bill Kovach and Thomas Rosenstiel’s completely revised and updated edition of  The Elements of Journalism: What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect is the book used at Journalism Dept at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. Course name: Principles of American Journalism.

“Kovach and Rosenstiel’s essays are concise gems, filled with insights worthy of becoming axiomatic…The book should become essential reading for journalism professionals and students and for the citizens they aim to serve.” –Carl Sessions Stepp, American Journalism Review

For more information on the book and the authors, visit http://www.randomhouse.com/acmart

Order an exam copy here.

August 21, 2009 at 7:02 pm Leave a comment

University of Minnesota -Twin Cities Students are Reading Life After Death: A History of the Afterlife in Western Religion

liofe

Alan Segal’s Life After Death: A History of the Afterlife in Western Religion is a masterful exploration of how Western civilizations have defined the afterlife. Here he weaves together biblical and literary scholarship, sociology, history, and philosophy to examine the maps of the afterlife found in Western religious texts and reveals not only what various cultures believed but how their notions reflected their societies’ realities and ideals, and why those beliefs changed over time.

Life After Death has been chosen at University of Minnesota -Twin Cities’s Classical and Near Eastern Studies Dept. Course will be on the Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World.

For more information on the book and the author, click here.

Order an exam copy here.

August 21, 2009 at 6:51 pm Leave a comment

The Acclaimed Bill Bryson Book, A Short History of Nearly Everything, Winner, 2004 Outstanding Academic Title, Choice Magazine, Now Adopted at SUNY Cobleskill

Shortlisted, by Britain’s Royal Society, for the prestigious “Aventis Prize for Science Books.”
Winner, 2004 Outstanding Academic Title, Choice Magazine Winner, 2004 Aventis General Prize, which celebrates the very best in popular science writing for adult readers.

Bill Bryson is one of the world’s most beloved and bestselling writers. In A Short History of Nearly Everything, he takes his ultimate journey–into the most intriguing and consequential questions that science seeks to answer. It’s a dazzling quest, the intellectual odyssey of a lifetime, as this insatiably curious writer attempts to understand everything that has transpired from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. Or, as the author puts it, “…how we went from there being nothing at all to there being something, and then how a little of that something turned into us, and also what happened in between and since.” (more…)

August 21, 2009 at 6:34 pm Leave a comment

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