Posts filed under ‘Asian Studies’

Philosophy Department Uncovers the Source Of Spontaneity With Trying Not To Try

9780770437619This spring, more than 35 students in North Central College’s introduction to philosophy course will use Edward Slingerland’s Trying Not to Try.  The book, which blends Eastern thought and cutting-edge science to explain why we find spontaneity so elusive, will support students as they learn the tenants of philosophy.  Although the text goes on-sale in March, complimentary advanced reader copies (ARCs) are available by request here.

Author Edward Slingerland was educated at Princeton, Stanford and the University of California at Berkeley.  He currently is a Professor of Asian Studies and Canada Research Chair in Chinese Thought and Embodied Cognition at the University of British Columbia.

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Order a desk or examination copy here

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February 6, 2014 at 11:11 pm Leave a comment

Fredrik Logevall’s Embers of War, Winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in History, Chronicles US and French Intervention in Vietnam

Embers of War HCby Fredrik Logevall, author of Embers of War (Random House, August 2012), winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in history.

Embers of War studies the conflict that drew in all the world’s powers and saw two of them—first France, then the United States—attempt to subdue the revolutionary Vietnamese forces. For France, the defeat marked the effective end of her colonial empire, while for America the war left a gaping wound in the body politic that remains open to this day.  In the below essay, Logevall distills key points from his book. (more…)

May 9, 2013 at 3:07 pm Leave a comment

Now in Paperback, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

9780307352156Watch Susan Cain’s 2012 TED Talk at www.thepowerofintroverts.com

Science and psychology is beginning to recognize how dramatically the introvert-extrovert spectrum shapes culture every bit as profoundly as gender or race. In a new paradigm-shifting book, Quiet, author Susan Cain highlights how misunderstood and and undervalued introverts often are, and gives introverts the tools to take full advantage of their personalities, while showing extroverts how they can learn from them. Passionately argued, superbly researched, and filled with stories of real people, Quiet shows why the world will depend on the strengths of introverts in the decades to come.

Quiet has been selected for common reading at Case Western Reserve University and is now being used in several courses at these following colleges:

Bucknell University; Colby-Sawyer College; Queens University Of Charlotte; University Of North Dakota Main Campus; University Of North Florida; and Wheaton College

Here is a Message from Susan Cain: (more…)

April 24, 2013 at 2:20 pm Leave a comment

Two Colleges Choose Behind the Beautiful Forevers for Fall courses

Behind the Beautiful ForeversThe University of Arkansas’s Department of Journalism and Vassar College’s Sociology Department have chosen Behind the Beautiful Forevers for their fall courses.
From Pulitzer Prize-winner Katherine Boo, a landmark work of narrative nonfiction that tells the dramatic and sometimes heartbreaking story of families striving toward a better life in one of the twenty-first century’s great, unequal cities.

In this brilliantly written, fast-paced book, based on three years of uncompromising reporting, a bewildering age of global change and inequality is made human.

Annawadi is a makeshift settlement in the shadow of luxury hotels near the Mumbai airport, and as India starts to prosper, Annawadians are electric with hope. Abdul, a reflective and enterprising Muslim teenager, sees “a fortune beyond counting” in the recyclable garbage that richer people throw away. Asha, a woman of formidable wit and deep scars from a childhood in rural poverty, has identified an alternate route to the middle class: political corruption. With a little luck, her sensitive, beautiful daughter—Annawadi’s “most-everything girl”—will soon become its first female college graduate. And even the poorest Annawadians, like Kalu, a fifteen-year-old scrap-metal thief, believe themselves inching closer to the good lives and good times they call “the full enjoy.” (more…)

July 6, 2012 at 3:21 pm Leave a comment

Nothing to Envy Selected for History Course at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke

nothing to envy

This is a real place – the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea or North Korea. The Communist regime that has controlled the northern  half of the Korean peninsula since 1945 might be the most totalitarian of modern world  history.

The winner of the 2010 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction, Barbara Demick’s Nothing To Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea offers a never-before-seen view of a country and society largely unknown to the rest of the world.

The book is on the course syllabus at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke (course name: History: The US and The Far East).  (more…)

October 12, 2010 at 1:48 pm Leave a comment

Bruce Cumings’ Acclaimed History on the Korean War Being Adopted at the University of Mexico

Here is a bracing account of a war that lingers in our collective memory as both ambiguous and unjustly ignored. For Americans, it was a discrete conflict lasting from 1950 to 1953 that has long been overshadowed by World War II, Vietnam, and the War on Terror. But as Bruce Cumings eloquently explains, for the Asian world the Korean War was a generations-long fight that still haunts contemporary events. And in a very real way, although its true roots and repercussions continue to be either misunderstood, forgotten, or willfully ignored, it is the war that helped form modern America’s relationship to the world.

With access to new evidence and secret materials from both here and abroad, including an archive of captured North Korean documents, Cumings reveals the war as it was actually fought.

The University of Mexico’s Political Science Dept is using The Korean War for a course on Civil Wars this Fall 2010. (more…)

September 29, 2010 at 8:03 pm Leave a comment

University of Michigan Selects The Cleanest Race: How North Koreans See Themselves and Why it Matters for World Politics Course

For years, North Korea watchers who speak no Korean have been confidently telling the world what motivates Kim Jong-Il. But in The Cleanest Race, B.R. Myers, a North Korea analyst and contributing editor of the Atlantic Monthly, presents the first full-length study of the North Korean worldview. In a lavishly illustrated work that draws on extensive research into the regime’s domestic propaganda, including films, romance novels and other artifacts of the personality cult, Myers analyzes each of the country’s official myths in turn—from the notion of Koreans’ unique moral purity, to the myth of an America quaking in terror of “the Iron General.” And in a groundbreaking historical section, Myers also traces the origins of this official culture back to the Japanese fascist thought in which North Korea’s first ideologues were schooled.  (more…)

June 17, 2010 at 7:03 pm Leave a comment

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