Posts filed under ‘Military History’

Free Advance Reader Copies of Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning by Timothy Snyder Now Available

9781101903452In this deeply researched and profoundly original book, Yale University history professor and historian Timothy Snyder has written a history of extermination and survival, an explanation of an unprecedented crime of the twentieth century that might serve as a precedent in the twenty-first. It tells the story of the Holocaust based on an array of new archival sources from eastern Europe and the voices of Jewish survivors to present the mass murder of the Jews in comprehensible historical terms–and thus all the more terrifyingly.

Black Earth is scheduled to be released on September 8th, 2015. Please email rhacademic@penguinrandomhouse.com with your name, college and course information to request a complimentary advance reader copy.

Click here to read about Professor Snyder’s Andrew Carnegie Fellowship award.

May 1, 2015 at 5:52 pm Leave a comment

Fredrik Logevall’s Embers of War, Winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in History, Chronicles US and French Intervention in Vietnam

Embers of War HCby Fredrik Logevall, author of Embers of War (Random House, August 2012), winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in history.

Embers of War studies the conflict that drew in all the world’s powers and saw two of them—first France, then the United States—attempt to subdue the revolutionary Vietnamese forces. For France, the defeat marked the effective end of her colonial empire, while for America the war left a gaping wound in the body politic that remains open to this day.  In the below essay, Logevall distills key points from his book. (more…)

May 9, 2013 at 3:07 pm Leave a comment

Nothing to Envy Selected for History Course at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke

nothing to envy

This is a real place – the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea or North Korea. The Communist regime that has controlled the northern  half of the Korean peninsula since 1945 might be the most totalitarian of modern world  history.

The winner of the 2010 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction, Barbara Demick’s Nothing To Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea offers a never-before-seen view of a country and society largely unknown to the rest of the world.

The book is on the course syllabus at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke (course name: History: The US and The Far East).  (more…)

October 12, 2010 at 1:48 pm Leave a comment

Bruce Cumings’ Acclaimed History on the Korean War Being Adopted at the University of Mexico

Here is a bracing account of a war that lingers in our collective memory as both ambiguous and unjustly ignored. For Americans, it was a discrete conflict lasting from 1950 to 1953 that has long been overshadowed by World War II, Vietnam, and the War on Terror. But as Bruce Cumings eloquently explains, for the Asian world the Korean War was a generations-long fight that still haunts contemporary events. And in a very real way, although its true roots and repercussions continue to be either misunderstood, forgotten, or willfully ignored, it is the war that helped form modern America’s relationship to the world.

With access to new evidence and secret materials from both here and abroad, including an archive of captured North Korean documents, Cumings reveals the war as it was actually fought.

The University of Mexico’s Political Science Dept is using The Korean War for a course on Civil Wars this Fall 2010. (more…)

September 29, 2010 at 8:03 pm Leave a comment

Free Copy Offer to Educators: Be the First to Adopt The Enough Moment: Fighting to End Africa’s Worst Human Rights Crimes by John Prendergast with Don Cheadle

In their New York Times bestseller, Not On Our Watch, human rights activist John Prendergast and Oscar-nominated actor Don Cheadle focused the world’s attention on genocide in Sudan by offering readers strategies on how to take action to end the tragedies. Here now is their continued call to action: The Enough Moment : Fighting to End Africa’s Worst Human Rights Crimes, an empowering look at how people’s movements and inspired policies can stop genocide, child soldier recruitment, and rape as a war weapon in Africa.

In The Enough Moment , Prendergast and Cheadle explain how hope, anger, citizen activism, social networking, compassion, celebrities, faith in action, and globalization are all coming together to produce the beginnings of a mass movement against human rights crimes.

As Prendergast and Cheadle describe, an “Enough Moment” is defined as that time when outrage triggers action and bystanders become “Upstanders,” or people who take action on behalf of others. But can ordinary citizens turn their Enough Moments into instruments of meaningful change? Prendergast and Cheadle say “yes,” illustrating with such examples: (more…)

August 16, 2010 at 4:00 pm Leave a comment

Save Darfur! Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror

saviors

From the author of the highly praised Good Muslim, Bad Muslim, here is the first analysis of the crisis in Darfur that considers the events of the last few years within the broad context of the history of Sudan, as well as examines the efficacy of the world’s response to the crisis. Incisive and authoritative, Saviors and Survivors will radically alter our understanding of the crisis in Darfur.

“An incisive and challenging analysis. Framing both Darfur’s war and the ‘Save Darfur’ movement within the paradigm of the West’s historic colonial encounter with Africa, Mahmood Mamdani challenges the reader to reconsider whether Darfur’s crisis is ‘genocide’ warranting foreign military intervention.”—Alex de Waal, Fellow at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and author of War in Darfur (more…)

July 7, 2010 at 8:35 pm Leave a comment

University of Michigan Selects The Cleanest Race: How North Koreans See Themselves and Why it Matters for World Politics Course

For years, North Korea watchers who speak no Korean have been confidently telling the world what motivates Kim Jong-Il. But in The Cleanest Race, B.R. Myers, a North Korea analyst and contributing editor of the Atlantic Monthly, presents the first full-length study of the North Korean worldview. In a lavishly illustrated work that draws on extensive research into the regime’s domestic propaganda, including films, romance novels and other artifacts of the personality cult, Myers analyzes each of the country’s official myths in turn—from the notion of Koreans’ unique moral purity, to the myth of an America quaking in terror of “the Iron General.” And in a groundbreaking historical section, Myers also traces the origins of this official culture back to the Japanese fascist thought in which North Korea’s first ideologues were schooled.  (more…)

June 17, 2010 at 7:03 pm Leave a comment

Students at Boston College and Western Oregon University are Reading The Translator by Zaghawa tribesman, Daoud Hari

translator

In 2003, Daoud Hari, a Zaghawa tribesman in northern Darfur, fled his village, which was under attack by Sudanese militiamen. Here is Daoud’s harrowing and life-changing, eyewitness account of the brutal genocide in the Sudan.

Western Oregon University’s Anthropology Dept. will be using the book this summer as well as Boston College’s Sociology Dept which has adopted The Translator: A Memoir for its course named “African World Perspective” this Fall. Zine Magubane, Associate Professor of Sociology, says “I chose this book because The Translator offers American students a superb opportunity to hear about the realities of the Darfur situation through the voice of an African person. The book is both an excellent primer on the political situation in Darfur and a deeply moving personal story that gives students a sophisticated, yet accessible, view into the Darfur conflict.” (more…)

May 19, 2010 at 3:09 pm Leave a comment

James Madison University Adopts Historiography Book Dangerous Games: The Uses and Abuses of History by Margaret MacMillan

In Dangerous Games: The Uses and Abuses of Historythe acclaimed author of Paris 1919 and Nixon and Mao reveals lessons and insights from a lifetime of writing and teaching history, about how we live our lives as individuals and nations.

Dangerous Games has been selected at James Madison University for course Twentieth Century World History.

“Reminds readers that history matters…. This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the importance of correctly understanding the past.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review (more…)

November 25, 2009 at 4:12 pm Leave a comment

Vanderbilt University’s Political Science Department Takes Up The Strongest Tribe

strongest

From a universally respected combat journalist, The Strongest Tribe: War, Politics, and the Endgame in Iraq is a gripping history based on five years of front-line reporting about how the war was turned around–and the choice now facing America.

The Strongest Tribe by Bing West will be the book taught by Vanderbilt University’s Political Science Department for their course: War in Iraq. (more…)

August 21, 2009 at 8:40 pm Leave a comment

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