Posts tagged ‘History’

Free Reader Copies of The Full Catastrophe: Travels Among the New Greek Ruins by James Angelos Available

9780385346481Over the last three years, tiny Greece, normally associated with ancient philosophers and marble ruins, whitewashed island villages and cerulean seas, has repeatedly brought world financial markets into panic and has cast the 60-year project of cultivating European unity into question. In The Full Catastrophe, journalist James Angelos makes sense of these two images of Greece and explains how and why Greece became the corrupt, socially fractious and bankrupt nation it is today. With vivid narratives and engaging reporting, he brings to life some of the causes of the country’s financial collapse, and examines the changes emerging in its aftermath.

The Full Catastrophe was published on June 6th, 2015. Please email rhacademic@penguinrandomhouse with your name, college and course information to request a complimentary copy.

Click here to read to about the book in The New York Times Book Review

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July 1, 2015 at 2:04 pm Leave a comment

Professors: Free Examination Copy Available. The Taste of Ashes by Marci Shore, professor of history at Yale

dcoverInterweaving archival history, scholarly research, personal recollections, and first-person vignettes, Yale historian and professor Marci Shore has written a unique treatise on post-communist Eastern Europe. Drawing on recently opened communist archives, and the memories of colleagues, acquaintances, and family members, Shore gives a platform to former communists and dissidents, Zionists, Stalinists, and their children and grandchildren. Moving across Berlin, Vienna, Prague, Warsaw, Bucharest, and Moscow, The Taste of Ashes is a scholarly yet personal portrait of events that, even as they recede into history, continue to resonate and reverberate today.

Here is a message from Marci Shore:

I was at an impressionable age when the revolutions came. This is the short answer I often give when asked by Poles or Czechs or Russians why I became interested in their part of the world. In 1989, I was seventeen years old and knew nothing about Eastern Europe. Yet growing up in suburban Pennsylvania, it was impossible not to absorb that we were locked in a struggle with the Evil Empire that might well bring about the end of the world. (more…)

January 28, 2013 at 6:29 pm Leave a comment

Bruce Cumings’ Acclaimed History on the Korean War Being Adopted at the University of Mexico

Here is a bracing account of a war that lingers in our collective memory as both ambiguous and unjustly ignored. For Americans, it was a discrete conflict lasting from 1950 to 1953 that has long been overshadowed by World War II, Vietnam, and the War on Terror. But as Bruce Cumings eloquently explains, for the Asian world the Korean War was a generations-long fight that still haunts contemporary events. And in a very real way, although its true roots and repercussions continue to be either misunderstood, forgotten, or willfully ignored, it is the war that helped form modern America’s relationship to the world.

With access to new evidence and secret materials from both here and abroad, including an archive of captured North Korean documents, Cumings reveals the war as it was actually fought.

The University of Mexico’s Political Science Dept is using The Korean War for a course on Civil Wars this Fall 2010. (more…)

September 29, 2010 at 8:03 pm Leave a comment

Outcasts United Joins Another College’s Fall Curriculum

outcasts united

Outcasts United: A Refugee Team, An American Town  is the story of a refugee soccer team, a remarkable woman coach and a small southern town in Clarkston, Georgia, turned upside down by the process of refugee resettlement.

Beloit College’s Writing Program has selected the book for its Fall 2009 course on The Long Horizon: Refugees in the United States and the University of Hartford’s Politics & Government Dept. is using it for their Globalization of People course.  Outcasts United: A Refugee Team, An American Town  is also a popular common reading selection at several colleges. For a complete list, click here.

“Truly unforgettable, Outcasts United offers a stirring lesson in the power of a single person to transform the lives of many. It’s an incisive window into the world ahead for all of us, where cultural diversity won’t be an ideal or a course requirement or a corporate initiative but a fact of life that has to be wrestled with and reconciled, if never quite resolved.”
—Reza Aslan, author of No God but God (more…)

May 19, 2010 at 4:09 pm Leave a comment

James Madison University Adopts Historiography Book Dangerous Games: The Uses and Abuses of History by Margaret MacMillan

In Dangerous Games: The Uses and Abuses of Historythe acclaimed author of Paris 1919 and Nixon and Mao reveals lessons and insights from a lifetime of writing and teaching history, about how we live our lives as individuals and nations.

Dangerous Games has been selected at James Madison University for course Twentieth Century World History.

“Reminds readers that history matters…. This is a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the importance of correctly understanding the past.” —Publishers Weekly, starred review (more…)

November 25, 2009 at 4:12 pm Leave a comment

Important Discussions are Taking Place in Pittsburgh – Root Shock Adopted at the University of Pittsburgh

By Mindy Fullilove, who is a M.D. and professor of public health at Columbia University, Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America, and What We Can Do About It is an important discussion of urban renewal and its effect on the African American community, when between 1949 and 1973 this federal program, spearheaded by business andreal estate interests, destroyed 1,600 African American neighborhoods in cities across the country.

Root Shock has been taught in several courses including the University of Pittsburgh’s course on the History of Black Pittsburgh. (more…)

August 21, 2009 at 8:56 pm Leave a comment

University of Minnesota -Twin Cities Students are Reading Life After Death: A History of the Afterlife in Western Religion

liofe

Alan Segal’s Life After Death: A History of the Afterlife in Western Religion is a masterful exploration of how Western civilizations have defined the afterlife. Here he weaves together biblical and literary scholarship, sociology, history, and philosophy to examine the maps of the afterlife found in Western religious texts and reveals not only what various cultures believed but how their notions reflected their societies’ realities and ideals, and why those beliefs changed over time.

Life After Death has been chosen at University of Minnesota -Twin Cities’s Classical and Near Eastern Studies Dept. Course will be on the Death and the Afterlife in the Ancient World.

For more information on the book and the author, click here.

Order an exam copy here.

August 21, 2009 at 6:51 pm Leave a comment

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